The elaborate Perugia Altarpiece, also known as the Guidalotti Polyptych, was commissioned in 1437 but probably not painted until c. 1447.   It was painted for the St Nicholas Chapel in the church of San Domenico at Perugia.

      It contains representations not only of the Virgin and Child and two angels but also of sixteen saints -- four in the side-panels and twelve in the pilasters.   The three predella panels depict story of St. Nicholas of Bari, who also appears in the left side-panel. 

      Most of the altarpiece is now owned by the Galleria Nazionale dell'Umbria, in Perugia, Italy. 

      [The triptych is currently displayed without its original frame in the Galleria Nazionale dell'Umbria in Perugia, but with only the last predella panel.

A 17th century document records that the altarpiece was commissioned in 1437, although modern art historians generally date it on stylistic grounds to the 1440s. 

It has been suggested that he painted this polyptych in late 1447, after his work in the Cappella Nuova of the Duomo, Orvieto and before his arrival in Rome. 

The figure of St Nicholas of Bari seems to be a portrait of Pope Nicholas V, Fra Angelico's friend and patron who was elected in 1448 and for whom Fra Angelico painted frescoes (1448-9) in similar style in what became known as the Cappellla Niccolina of the Vatican. 

The polyptych seems to have been removed soon after 1614.  The predella was displayed separately from the rest of the work by the early 18th century, when both parts were in the sacristy.  Most of the panels escaped requisition in the Napoleonic period, but the three panels from the predella were confiscated:

- Remove red background;
- Make thumbnails for main panels;

- Add info re main panels;

- Add images and links for main panels;

- Add image-links for predella panels. 
- Add link to Supino material? 

- Outline Supino material??


1:  Roundels
2:  Main panels
3:  Predella


[WGA index page: 
Virgin and Child  ]

http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html/html/a/angelico/06/

http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html/html/a/angelico/06/perugia.html
http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html/html/a/angelico/06/perugia0.html

http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html/html/a/angelico/06/perugia2.html
http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html/html/a/angelico/06/perugia1.html
http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html/html/a/angelico/06/perugia3.html

http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html/html/a/angelico/06/predel1.html
[http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html/html/a/angelico/06/peredel2.html . . . ]
http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html/html/a/angelico/06/predel3.html




General:
Perugia Altarpiece
(Guidalotti Polyptych)
c. 1447
Galleria Nazionale dell'Umbria, Perugia

The three predella scenes depict the story of St Nicholas.








Left side-panel:  St. Dominic , St. Nicholas of Bari;
Center panel:  Virgin and Child Enthroned with (Four?) Angels;
Right side-panel:  St. John the Baptist, St. Catherine of Alexandria.

Saints, on either side: pilasters (left pilaster; right pilaster?).
(A rectangular column with a capital and base, projecting only slightly from a wall as an ornamental motif.)

Easily 6 feet high; Counting the three main panels only, the altarpiece is more than 7 feet across. 



Annunciation (Angel and Virgin)



Annunciatory Angel
Diameter: 29 cm (11")
Galleria Nazionale di Umbria, Perugia


Aiwaz: info page

WGA: info page;
          large image


Virgin Annunciate
Diameter: 29 cm (11")
Galleria Nazionale di Umbria, Perugia

Aiwaz: info page;

WGA: info page;
          large image






Left side-panel:
St. Dominic, St. Nicholas of Bari
95 x 73 cm.  (3' 2" x 2' 5")

WGA: info page;
          large image

 


Virgin and Child
130 x 77 cm. (4' 3" x 2' 6")

WGA: info page;
          large image

http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/a/angelico/06/predel1.html

World Gallery of Art:
     Info page
     Large image
  
Right side-panel:
St. John the Baptist, St. Catherine of Alexandria
95 x 73 cm.   (3' 2" x 2' 5")

WGA: info page;
          large image




The three predella panels depict the story of St Nicholas, in seven scenes.





34 x 60 cm. (1' 1" x 2') Pincacoteca Vatican, Rome

a: Birth of St. Nicholas;
b: Calling of St. Nicholas;
c: St. Nicholas gives dowries to three poor girls. 


WGA: info page;
          large image
34 x 60 cm. (1' 1" x 2') Pinacoteca Vatican, Rome

a:  Meeting of St. Nicholas with [the messenger of?] the emperor;
b: Propagation of the wheat;
c:  Miraculous saving of a ship.

WGA: info page;
          large image

34 x 60 cm. (1' 1" x 2')
Galleria Nazionale dell'Umbria, Perugia

a: St. Nicholas frees 3 innocents;
b: Death of St. Nicholas.



WGA: info page;
          large image


http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/a/angelico/06/predel1.html
[http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/a/angelico/06/predel2.html ??]

http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/a/angelico/06/predel3.html


The first two predella panels are in the Pinacoteca Vaticana.

aiwaz, info:
St. Nicholas: birth, calling, alms-giving  (Vatican)
Large image

St. Nicholas: saving a ship; propagating wheat (?)  (Vatican) 

Large image


St. Nicholas:  frees the innocent; on his deathbed  (Perugia)

Large image

WGA: 

Info page


WGA: info page;
          large image


Info re this polyptych: 


http://www.ktucitywalks.co.uk/285.html


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From web page:  http://www.slowtrav.com/blog/sandrac/2010/02/behaving_badly_in_perugias_nat.html

So here is a bit of my prep work for my visit to Perugia's National Gallery in June.

I’m going to make a beeline for Sala VIII and spend a good chunk of time examining Fra Angelico’s great altarpiece, the Guidalotti Polyptych, which was painted in about 1447.

It’s believed this polyptych (that is, a many-panelled painting) was painted for the Guidalotti family by Fra Angelico for the Cappella di San Nicolò (the Chapel of St. Nicholas) in Perugia’s wonderful church of San Domenico.

(The top two photos – the Virgin of the Annunciation and the Angel of the Annunciation are pieces from this polyptych; the third photo just above is the entire altarpiece.)

By the way, Fra Angelico, who belonged to a Dominican order, is often referred to as “Beato” Angelico. He was given the title Beato, or the Blessed, apparently because of his virtues, but I imagine it also had to do with his great gifts as a painter. (The title Fra is an abbreviation of frate and is a conventional title for a friar or brother).

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